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Planning for the Future

Elysium – Be Prepared for the Future service

Be prepared for the rest of you life sounds like a very tall order. However Tony Granger strips it down to the really important actions that you need to carry out so that when you die your relatives are not put into the difficult position of sorting it all out. If you do prepare, you will save £1,000s and perhaps more importantly, you will sleep through the night.

In this video Tony describes why you need to be prepared; what you should do to be prepared; and how we can help you.

Bring order out of chaos!

 

Planning for the Future

Different Types of Funeral Plans

Following on from the first video in this new series of Planning for the Future, when Tony explained the Benefits of Funeral Plans, the second video describes the Different Types of Funeral Plans. These include a Lump Sum Plan, Guaranteed Whole of Life Plan, Life Assurance, Savings and Loans as well as State Benefits. Also Tony thought that it would be helpful to explain the growing option of Leaving your Body to Science, in particular how you can do this and a few tips about what you might need to plan for.

A New Series of Videos

Planning for the Future

Our MD, Tony Granger, decided that we should have a whole series of videos to explain why planning for the future is so important. So we have begun with the benefits of a funeral plan, about which many people are now interested as the cost of these plans has been rising significantly over recent years.

In the first video Tony describes the benefits of the funeral plans, and this will be followed by the explanation of the different types of plans available in the market currently.  In due course other videos will cover different issues including: the need to prepare for later life; and the end of life; the importance of having a will (especially if your current one is not up to date; the advantages of setting up a trust; and safeguarding your house.

The rise of alternative funerals

When Rosie Grant’s mother died following a terminal illness, she fulfilled her mum’s wish to have a personal and unique funeral.

coffin

Rather than choose a typical Victorian-style service offered by many traditional undertakers, Ms Grant and her brother arranged for the ceremony to be held in a thatched barn, followed by a woodland burial, with a tree planted on top of the grave.

“It wasn’t the slickest funeral ever, but it was lovely, and so many people contributed in different ways,” says Ms Grant.

rosie grant

The event also sparked a light-bulb moment for the 46-year-old, who decided she wanted to enter the industry, to help other people looking for more unusual, eco-friendly, or bespoke, funerals.

“It started off as an interest for me,” she says. “I wanted to help families create their own farewell rituals.”

Rosie Inman-Cook, manager of the Natural Death Centre, a charity set up to facilitate natural funerals, notes that many of the new, alternative funeral directing businesses are being opened by women.

She adds: “Many are starting such a business because they’ve experienced a dreadful funeral for a family member and thought, ‘I can do so much better’.

“They don’t do black, shiny cars and twirling silver canes, unless that’s what the family wants.”

When the bereaved visit one of Green Endings’ three branches in London, they might be offered champagne to raise a toast to a family member, or a slice of cake as they sit on the sofa.

“We don’t want people to feel like they’re applying for a mortgage,” says Jeremy Smith, who took over Green Endings in 2008 when the previous owner retired.

“We want to be more natural, not pompous, and we don’t ask if they’d like to see the brass handles [on the coffin] and all that horrible nonsense, when someone has died,” adds the 55-year-old. “We want to treat people properly.”

When the bereaved visit one of Green Endings’ three branches in London, they might be offered champagne to raise a toast to a family member, or a slice of cake as they sit on the sofa.

“We don’t want people to feel like they’re applying for a mortgage,” says Jeremy Smith, who took over Green Endings in 2008 when the previous owner retired.

“We want to be more natural, not pompous, and we don’t ask if they’d like to see the brass handles [on the coffin] and all that horrible nonsense, when someone has died,” adds the 55-year-old. “We want to treat people properly.”

Like Natural Endings, Green Endings, as the name suggests, focuses on creating eco-friendly funerals. It also uses a bright pink hearse, and even a tricycle, to transport coffins to funerals.

“In the 15 years I’ve been working in this business, I’ve seen the rise of the green burial site as a key trend,” says Mr Smith.

“There’s so much more interest in being buried in a natural environment without regimented lawns and marble memorials.”

Source: BBC News 7/01/16

Funeral Song Favourites

sinatra

The latest funeral music survey found that while the most popular songs played at funerals in 2016 were largely sentimental there was still room for humour – but hymns were getting less and less popular. The main themes seem to be the notions of saying goodbye but not farewell, of defiance and hope rather than solemnity and pity.

The top five funeral music from 2016 were:

  1. My Way – Frank Sinatra (the hardy perennial)

  2. Time To Say Goodbye – Sarah Brightman/Andrea Bocelli, or Katherine Jenkins(operatic hit)

  3. Over The Rainbow – Eva Cassidy(posthumous Wizard Of Oz hit)

  4. Wind Beneath My Wings – Bette Midler (‘Didn’t you know that you’re my hero?’)

  5. The Lord Is My Shepherd (Psalm 23)(the highest placed hymn)

The number one from 2014, Monty Python’s “Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life”, was still hanging in there in the top 10, and remains the top pop choice for the over-50s, followed by Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway To Heaven”.

Are pop songs becoming more popular than hymns?

According to Alison Crake, president of the National Association of Funeral Directors, popular music is “certainly becoming more commonplace” at funerals, with funerals today becoming “as much a celebration of life as a farewell, and are becoming increasingly personalised.”

And logically, if funerals are increasingly a ‘celebration of life’ rather than a sombre occasion, it is not hard to see why pop songs are overtaking hymns in popularity, with just 12 per cent of those aged 50 to 54 choosing a hymn, compared to one in four over-65s.

More modern pop songs that are gaining in use include Adele’s “Hello” and Wiz Khalifa’s “See You Again”, with Robbie Williams’ “Angels” still a popular funeral song.

Have you thought about your own funeral wishes?

Planning ahead for a funeral is of course more than just about the music. With the cost of funerals going up all the time, having a pre-paid funeral plan can provide peace of mind to make a difficult situation that bit easier when the time comes.

  • It can help protect your family from financial stress and having to plan it all themselves
  • Buying a plan fixed at current prices can protect you against future inflation
  • The funds in the plan are safeguarded until it is needed
  • Paying by instalments can help spread the cost and help you budget

The Elysium Over Fifties Plan from One Family offer monthly premiums to suit your pocket and help protect your loved ones from worry and financial stress.

Source: Daily Telegraph June 6th 2017